Tag Archives: motorcycle

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Jodi

Once again, I am amazed at how lady motorcyclist cross my path! I’ve been pretty busy lately, hence the lack of blogging, tweeting, and commenting on other blogs (FYI I’m terrible at that, but I do read most of them!) Today I took a moment to see what was happening on Twitter and I caught one of @Moto_Diva’s tweets: “@npdriving: Motorcycle Diaries: Becoming a biker chick is tougher than it looks http://natpo.st/148KiRT  #cars

Needless to say it intrigued me so I clicked through to read about Jodi Lai from Toronto, ON. Jodi is the editor of Post Driving at the National Post and had a story titled, Motorcycle Diaries: Becoming a biker chick is tougher than it looks. I highly recommend reading the article! Once again, I reached out to see if she’d like to join in on the fun and Jodi said YES! Jodi tweets from @NPDriving, but doesn’t have a personal account. Check out and follow her on Instagram too!

Please give a warm welcome to Jodi!

Please give a warm welcome to Jodi!

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? I just learned to ride in June 2013.

How did you learn to ride? I took the weekend Beginner Basics course with RTI (Rider Training Institute) in Toronto.

What was your first motorcycle? I haven’t bought a bike yet, but I’m looking at getting a Suzuki TU250, which is the bike I learned to ride on.

How many have you owned? None yet. Hopefully, I’ll change this soon!

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? When I first saw the new blacked out Harley-Davidson Softail Slim, I was determined to learn to ride so that motorcycle could be mine. I think that motorcycle was made for people like me. It’s sexy and has a sinister swagger to it. I also like being the anti-stereotype. I don’t see many Asian females on bikes in Toronto, and I wanted to change that.

Tell us about your riding. I really have no interest in speed when it comes to motorcycles. I’m more of a relaxed cruising type of rider. Eventually I’d like to ride to work, but I have to get better at riding first!

Jodi 10

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle? I’d advise taking a beginners course. They ease you into it in a very easy-to-handle way. Also, if people heckle you, just think how much more awesome you are then them. I think that every time a woman gets on a bike, she’s doing it for girls everywhere.

What do you do when you’re not riding? I’m the editor of Post Driving, so I drive a lot of cars, but in my spare time, I bake, rock climb, yoga and get tattoos 🙂

Well, I believe Jodi is the newest female motorcyclist we’ve met! Ladies, I’m still taking names to keep this series going! No matter where you are in the world I’d love to include your story. Email me at pamela(dot)court@gmail(dot)com {trying to keep the spammers at bay}!

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet LC a.k.a. @SmartBikerChick

Y’all have heard me sing the praises of social media. Well, I have another verse to add by the name of LC a.k.a. @SmartBikerChick from Atlanta, GA, but considers herself a world traveler. Follow her journey on Twitter.

LC a.k.a. @SmartBikerChick

LC a.k.a. @SmartBikerChick

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? I caught the motorcycle bug unexpectedly about five years ago.

How did you learn to ride? I took a motorcycle class to get my feet wet.  Then, my fellow veteran riding friends taught me the real ropes through the mountains.

What was your first motorcycle? Go big or go home, right? I’m not one for switching around, so I went for what I really wanted. BMW F800ST

How many have you owned? I’m loyal… one!

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle?  After riding on the back of a few bikes, I decided it was time to stop dating guys just because they had a bike and to learn how to ride for myself.  Freedom!

Tell us about your riding. Riding is pure enjoyment; I ride for the fun of it.

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle?  Do it!  Ride

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? Most memorable trip was 450 miles through heavy rains… it was quite an adventure! I have stories for life from that weekend.

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? Off or online?  I’ve been on twitter only a month, but I’ve really taken a liking to this motorcycle community.

Do you have a favorite riding story? A guy, who was trying to impress me, started talking about buying a scooter to ride around the city. I told him I had a motorcycle.

What do you do when you’re not riding? There’s life outside of riding??Okay, maybe there is. I have too many other interests to list here.

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Carolynn a.k.a. @CarolynnSells

Some days I just sit amazed at how I get connected with these lady motorcyclist. My next guest was referred to my by @KHaylock. Thank you Ken! It seems like I’ve had a streak of racing women lately and about to add another to the mix! Strap on your seat belts we are jumping the pond to meet Carolynn Sells a.k.a. @CarolynnSells from Isle of Man! You can find her on Facebook and check out her web site CarolynnSells.co.uk.

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? Since I was about 12, although I’ve been around bikes & racing paddocks since I was very little.

Carolynn's love of two wheels started early! Age 4

Carolynn’s love of two wheels started early! Age 4

How did you learn to ride? My brother got an off road bike & I used to ride that around our back garden. I nearly took out the family greenhouse, first time out.

What was your first motorcycle? My own was a Black & Red, Yamaha RD50 with Micron exhaust, which got me on the open road at the age of 16.

How many have you owned? Not many, actually… about 6, I think, but I’ve ridden a lot more than that. The first one I owned was my RD50, back in 1989, the last was the only race bike I owned, which I sold to my dad after I packed in racing at the end of 2009… My Blue & White RD350LC was my favourite. I miss that bike.

Carolynn's beloved 350LC

Carolynn’s beloved 350LC

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? My Dad has built & ridden bikes since he was a teenager, then he started racing when I was 5, nearly 6. I spent my childhood in the racing paddock & travelling around the country in vans, going to race meetings. Then, when I was 12, we went to the Isle of Man (we lived in Lancashire, in the North West of England, at the time) for my Dad to race in the Manx Grand Prix on the TT Course. I decided that I wanted to race there too, one day…

Carolynn's first race April 2000

Carolynn’s first race April 2000

Tell us about your riding. Initially messing about in fields, then commuting/transport & then eventually, my ultimate goal… real road racing.

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle? Get out there & do it… Anybody can do anything they want to do, if they have the drive & the ambition. Being female isn’t an obstacle.

Parliament Junior Ady3

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? Well… each race on the TT Course was 150 miles & I completed 10 of those. We did do 4 weeks around Europe (France, Germany, Belgium & Luxembourg) when I was a kid, but my mum & dad were on the bike, me & my brother were in the sidecar with all our tents, sleeping stuff, cooking equipment etc.

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? Off or online? Both… I’m now a Director of the Manx Motor Cycle Club, who organize & run the Manx Grand Prix road races & am also one of two Rider Liaison Officers for the club & the event. I have set up a Facebook group & a page for the club too. When I first started road riding, I was a member of the BMF (British Motorcyclists Federation) and that is who I passed my CBT & road test with. I have also been a member of several Road Racing clubs (in order to get race entries) in the UK, Ireland & the Isle of Man, and of course, got my annual race licence from the ACU (Auto Cycle Union).

why arai

Do you have a favorite riding story? I have so many to choose from, but it has to be my win on the Isle of Man TT Mountian Course in 2009. 24 years after that first trip the Isle of Man and 6 years after my first race on the circuit, I became the first woman ever to win a race on the Isle of Man TT Mountain Course, when I won the Ultra Lightweight Manx Grand Prix race by over 62 seconds from the 2nd placed man. I’m still the only woman to win on that circuit, in over 106 years of racing. You can read about it in my 2009 race Diary, here.

Norma Farmer21

What do you do when you’re not riding? I’m a mum, who runs a home & works part-time as an Assistant Manager. I help organise road races & tutor newcomers in any spare time that I do have & get to play out, very, very occasionally.

P.S. One thing Carolynn didn’t mention was she is a Guinness World Record holder!

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Christie a.k.a. @Christieland

About a year ago I profiled Krystyna (KK), or on Twitter @KK352, a true lady motorcyclist! I tweeted once again asking for help finding more female riders and KK responded with a recommendation to contact her friend Christie a.k.a. @Christieland. I did and she said yes!! Christie has some amazing skills you can check out her blog Passed by a Chick!

Christie with her racing mechanic, Nikki Nienow

Christie with her racing mechanic, Nikki Nienow

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? 7 years

How did you learn to ride? MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation)

What was your first motorcycle? 2003 Suzuki SV650S

How many have you owned? 5

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? I initially wanted to learn how
to ride simply to know the skill and see if I might like it.  I had this idea in my head it’d be cool to know how to drive well, ride a motorcycle, fly a plane, James Bond stuff like that.  In case I ever needed to make a quick getaway and that was the only vehicle around!

Tell us about your riding. Turns out I really liked it.  I had so much fun in my MSF class that I knew I wanted to buy a street bike.  I got the Suzuki SV650S and started joining group rides in the mountains and occasionally commuting through gnarly Silicon Valley traffic to my job at Google.

A friend suggested a track day, which turned into another track day, which turned into racing lessons, and then racing.  Four years later I quit racing, and at that point I was fast enough at Sonoma Raceway to qualify for AMA SuperSport but declined to make a run at the pros, deciding instead to cash in my chips and walk away in one piece.

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle?  Take an honest look at your driving ability, if you can. Everyone says they’re a good driver, naturally.  But are you, really? Do you know how to drive defensively?  When unexpected things happen on the road, do you blame others, or think about how you could have avoided the situation better?  If you feel you’re a good driver and can also keep your ego in check, go for it.  For me, motorcycling changed my life.

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle?  I rode my
niece’s boyfriend’s Harley from Omaha, Nebraska to South Carolina two
summers ago.

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? Off or online? No

Do you have a favorite riding story? They’re almost all favorites.

What do you do when you’re not riding? Ride my bicycle!  I race road
and mountain bikes now.  No more motor bike racing for me!  My
husband, a former pro motorcycle racer, and I are expecting our first
child in late August, so I’m not racing anything right now (except to
the bathroom, about a million times a day) but am still logging lots
of miles on my pedal bikes.

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Grace a.k.a. @SeismicCoach

I am so glad on February 11, 2010 I decided to start this blog to chronicle my journey into motorcycling. It has not only recorded my story, but has opened the door to share other lady rider’s stories as well! We are such a beautiful and diverse group and I have another female motorcyclist to add. Please welcome Grace or on Twitter @SeismicCoach from British Columbia, Canada. Check out her web site Seismic Coaching.

Grace a.k.a. @SeismicCoach

Grace a.k.a. @SeismicCoach

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? Two years, but missing this third season.

How did you learn to ride? I learned to ride with the fine folks at Pacific Riding School. I come from a road cycling and technical mountain biking background with some race experience. Some key bicycling skills translated naturally (with minor adjustments for a heavier bike) into motorcycling, including leaning and counter-steering, looking far ahead, looking beyond the turn, traffic awareness, braking concepts (front-wheel vs. rear wheel), and keeping an eye on road conditions.

What was your first motorcycle? A 2007 Suzuki Boulevard S40. It’s a great starter bike that, like me, was small and compact with a solid thirst for adventures.

How many have you owned? Just the one so far. Looking to buy the next one ASAP.

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? I’m an adventure motorcyclist at heart. I still love to mountain bike, but motorcycling takes adventure and travel to the next level. Everything about the open air appeals to my core – the smells, sharper focus and awareness, open to the elements, and even the dynamic “textures” of air during a ride – can’t get enough of it. At the time I got my Class 6 licence, I was several months into launching my own consulting business and had just finished Big Contract #1. Learning to ride anchored the deep-soul gratifying independence and flexibility borne of building a business. Now it permeates much of who I am and how my business grows.

Tell us about your riding. Every ride is pure pleasure regardless of purpose. I took a couple of short solo trips within the province and gained some new skills and confidence at Reg Pridmore’s CLASS course in Rosamond, California. I live in a more rural area with easy access to city centres. Many rides are about scouting different routes and back roads.

Duffy Lake loop

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle?Taking the MSF course (in Canada, MSA, Motorcycle Skills Assessment) is a no-brainer.

1)     Try custom-fitted vented earplugs. It’s a personal preference and, given that I like long rides, I no longer get headaches from sustained loud noise;

2)     Although not imperative, solid bicycle handling skills can ease the transition to motorcycling. Just remember the front brake lever is on the right-hand side on a motorcycle.

3)     Age is inconsequential;

4)     There’s a reason that you’re curious about motorcycling. Listen to that inner voice. Take a stand for your curiosity and desire to keep learning. No such thing as a silly question as everyone had to start at Square One, including the pros.

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? The longest trip was an overnighter from the Fraser Valley area of British Columbia to Campbell River on Vancouver Island. The first day of the trip felt longer because Island weather greeted me with sun, rain, wind, hail, sun, clouds, sun, more rain, more hail… in July! Oddly, I didn’t mind it. The plan with the next bike is to take multi-day trips. With my business, I have the flexibility to take an extended trip and notify clients well in advance. I’m currently savouring the process of dreaming, planning, and researching that first big trip.

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? I’m a member of the LIME (Ladies International Motorcycle Enthusiast) group based in Vancouver, but I tend to ride solo or occasionally with a friend.

Do you have a favorite riding story? One of my favourites is the time I refueled at a quiet gas station in Fort Langley, BC. Imagine a petite woman, solo and gassing up, as an older gentleman with grizzled white beard and tousled hair limps toward her with a crooked, toothy grin. His first words were, “That’s a really nice bike. I remember my first bike when I was 15…” His was a love story of his first bike and the impact of riding throughout his life. I leaned on my bike and listened to the whole thing – wasn’t in a rush. I soaked in his every eye-twinkle, chuckle, and gesture. That could be any of us x years from now. Everyone has a unique and beautiful story, motorcycle-related or not.

What do you do when you’re not riding? I run, mountain bike, and kayak… oh, so West Coast! My business recently launched an initiative called Moto Leadership which brings relevant leadership development to professionals who ride motorcycles, although it’s also open to non-riders. The first event is slated for June 2014 in British Columbia, so there’s plenty to keep things hopping. And, as always, there are extended trips to plan!

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Katherine a.k.a. @HarrieHarpist

I’m so excited about introducing my next lady motorcyclist! We “met” via Twitter her handle is @harrieharpist a.k.a. Katherine. She says she is also known by her school/bike/racing friends as Harrie (from her surname) and hails from Glasgow, Scotland. Katherine is a harpist (how cool is that ?!) and has a blog Strings Wings and Things! You know the drill … check it out!

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? Since I was 17, so 18 years this September.

Katherine

Katherine

How did you learn to ride? My first time riding a motorbike was actually on a speedway tryout course, but I took my UK road licence in the normal way – a day’s CBT (Compulsory Basic Training) first and then I took weekly lessons and rode everywhere on my little Honda H100 until I was ready for my full bike test. Some people do an intensive training programme and do the whole thing in 3 or 5 days, but I needed a bit longer to build up my confidence.

What was your first motorcycle? A beautiful blue Honda H100

How many have you owned? 11 altogether

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? My dad has ridden since before I was born (and my mum has a licence too although she no longer rides) and I’m a daddy’s girl so wanted to go out on the back of his bike. I was hooked! He is really into speedway so he used to take me and my brother to watch a lot when we were younger. Now I take him to watch British Superbike races whenever I can.

Photo by Guy Cope Images www.copeimages.com

Photo by Guy Cope Images http://www.copeimages.com

Tell us about your riding. Commuter, pleasure, vacation, racing, or ? All of the above! I started riding when I was at (high) school but couldn’t afford the beautiful bikes I saw in all the magazines. When I started again in 2006 after a long break from riding, I had a good job so could pick and choose a bit more. I quickly moved from road riding to trackdays and then to racing. My bike was my main mode of transport for a while and I rode all year round. I still ride on the road although I haven’t ridden very much recently as I’ve moved and my road bike is still at my old house. I can’t wait to get it back!

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle? Just do it. Find a sympathetic instructor (doesn’t have to be a woman) preferably who isn’t a close friend/partner/related to you. Accept that if you want to have a good choice of bikes to ride, you may never get both feet on the floor. Don’t take no for an answer. If you fall off, get back up again with a smile even if it hurts. Ignore any stupid sexist comments you get in shops or on rides, just go elsewhere until you find somewhere that suits.

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? I rode to France once with my ex husband and a big group of fellow Ducati riders. The mission was Ashford (in Kent) to Omaha beach (one of the sites of the D-Day landings in Normandy in France) and back in a single day – more than 500 miles on bikes that weren’t renowned for their touring capabilities. We had a further 100 miles each way to ride from our house to get to Ashford, but we did these outside the 24 hours thank goodness. It was one of the most amazing adventures I’ve ever had. I came back with a bent bike and a severely bruised foot after pulling away with my side stand down, getting my foot stuck under the bike and taking out my front brake lever, but I’ll never forget the experience and the friends I made. There was torrential rain for the last leg back from Normandy to Calais for the Eurotunnel, then delays in the rain when we got to the terminal, but we all made it home with some great stories. By the time I got back to my bed, I’d been awake for 24 hours.

Photo by Guy Cope Images www.copeimages.com

Photo by Guy Cope Images http://www.copeimages.com

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? Not any more, although I met most of my bike friends via internet forums in the UK.

Do you have a favorite riding story? I have so many! The French trip is up there, but I’ve also had some brilliant times racing. One of my favourite stories is from when I first started riding aged 17. I worked at a supermarket to earn the money for my insurance etc, and one of the other girls rode as well. One Sunday, we went for an evening ride after work. I was on my H100, she was on a really ratty AR50 so although we didn’t ride far, it took a while as we couldn’t go very fast. I think it was February or something.

Normally my dad hid my bike keys if it was icy as he knew I would try and ride regardless, but on this day I don’t think he had banked on me riding after work. It was so cold out, and when I got home I made the mistake of getting into a hot bath to warm up. When I got out of the bath, I passed out on the floor and came round to find my dad trying to help me up. For his troubles, I was sick all over his feet. It was my first experience of what extreme cold can do to your body and I am much more careful now!

Another favourite was my first ever time racing, which was a 3 hour moped endurance race. I was in a team of 3 with 2 other of my friends (both girls) riding a Honda C70 moped and it was brilliant. Another time I borrowed a friend’s R1 for a test ride with 5 other girls, all riding sports bikes. We stopped for lunch at quite a smart restaurant and caused quite a stir with our shiny bikes, leathers and helmet hair!

What do you do when you’re not riding? I’m a musician – I play the harp and have just returned to full time study, so I’m normally practicing or playing in a concert somewhere. I have two greyhounds and love spending time with them. Other than that, I love running and cycling, although they don’t quite give me the speed buzz I get from my motorbike. I haven’t ridden in a little while, but riding a motorbike is part of my identity and is my greatest passion.

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Lois

Have you ever heard the old saying, “you have not because you ask not?” Well, this applies to me and my next guest, Lois. I’m racking my brain trying to remember how I came across her website Lois On The Loose. You have to go take a look at all her accomplishments! Lois has several epic road trips under her belt, written two books (I’ve got to get these!!), a contributing writer and editor to several publications, and also does public speaking. Wow! Back to the old saying … I reached out to Lois earlier this year asking if she’d like to add her profile of a female motorcyclist to my blog. She said yes, but was about to leave on a trip and would do it when she had some spare time. And she did, so now I’m adding another lady rider to the mix. I am so glad I asked Lois. I think this is the 80th profile of a female motorcyclist! Join me in welcoming Lois Pryce from London, UK.

Lois Pryce

Lois Pryce

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? 12 years
How did you learn to ride? I did an intensive 5-day course in London.
What was your first motorcycle? A 1959 BSA Bantam D7

Lois and her first motorcycle

Lois and her first motorcycle

How many have you owned? 8
Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? I just thought it looked like a lot of fun!
Tell us about your riding. Adventure, exploring, off-roading, world travelling…

Lois in Morocco and a camel sign

Lois in Morocco and a camel sign

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle? Don’t let anyone put you off – there is so much fun to be had on two wheels and so many great people to meet – it opens up a whole world.
What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? 20,000 miles, from Alaska to Argentina
Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? No, but the collective of worldwide motorcycle travelers is an unofficial international club!

Peru desert riding

Peru desert riding

Do you have a favorite riding story? So many, I couldn’t even begin… they are all in my books
What do you do when you’re not riding? Play the banjo in the UK’s only all-girl bluegrass band The Jolenes, mess about on boats, go kayaking, write, read and grow stuff in my garden.

Seriously friends, I encourage you to hop over to Lois On The Loose to find out more about this amazing woman motorcyclist!

Profile of a Female Motorcyclist: Meet Nadieh a.k.a. Shoots

I feel like I’ve only found the tip of the iceberg when it comes to meeting lady motorcyclists! I’m so thankful for all the women that have step forward and shared their stories. Each one unique, full of wisdom, and real life lessons to learn. Thank you!

Buckle your seat belts because I am headed to Rotterdam in the Netherlands to introduce you to Nadieh a.k.a. @Shoots40. Nadieh is a motorcycle racer! Check out her web site Nadieh-Racing.nl.

Nahieh a.k.a @Shoots40

Nahieh a.k.a @Shoots40

How long have you been riding a motorcycle? 3.5 years, plus 4 years of pocketbikes

How did you learn to ride? When I started out racing pocketbikes at 14, my dad took me to a big empty parking lot to do braking and turning drills preparing for my first race. I didn’t get ride a ‘real’ motorcycle with a clutch and suspension (’97 Aprilia RS250 street bike) on the track until I was 18, and was dragging my knee, foot peg and exhaust by the end of the first day … using skills I mostly learned from reading books.

Wilrijk-09

Pocket-bike

What was your first motorcycle? The above mentioned 1997 Aprilia RS250.

'09 Aprilia 250

’09 Aprilia 250

How many have you owned? The Aprilia is the only one I fully paid for myself. But over the years I’ve had the pleasure of racing full seasons on a Ducati 749RS, Triumph Daytona 675R and Yamaha R6.

Why did you want to ride a motorcycle? I was tired of always watching others ride! Instead of spectating at a race, or being the passenger of either of my parents, all I wanted was to ride a bike myself. Lucky for me we discovered pocket-bikes.

Ducati-10

Nadieh on a Ducati

Tell us about your riding. I’m a racer through and through. I took a few lessons last year to see if I wanted to get my license, but did not enjoy riding the streets at all. There are so many things and people to watch out for, to me it’s more like a chore. Also I have a tough enough time staying out of trouble driving a car (I’ve perfected the racing lines on local roundabouts, frequently push 70-75 on small back roads, etc). My budget doesn’t allow for the fines I’d surely pick up riding a bike. One day, when my competitive streak doesn’t have the upper hand anymore, I do hope to go on a motorcycle vacation in the mountains of Italy.

What advice do you have for women who ride or want to ride a motorcycle? Just do it and don’t let anyone tell you women are lesser riders for whatever reason, because that’s bullcrap! Other than that, always make sure you’re having fun.

What is the longest trip that you’ve taken on your cycle? I suppose that would have to be my over an hour stint in the 2012 WERA Endurance race at Miller Motorsports Park, haha. Which so far is also the furthest I’ve ever traveled to compete in a race.

Do you belong to any motorcycle groups? Closest to this would be the BWMRC Racing Team. This team was founded very recently, and its purpose is to help promote women in road racing (road as in Isle of Man). I’m lucky to be involved with the start-up process, and will be competing in road races for BWMRC in the future.

R6-12

Do you have a favorite riding story? It’s hard to pick just one. The absolutely amazing 2 weeks I had at Miller last year with SGA Racing, the awesome 6-way battle at Brno during my first year in the 3D Cup. When purely about riding though, I’d have to go with my elbow down story. It was my second season of racing, and the first test with my new Triumph Daytona 675. On the last day clouds and lower temperatures prevented any improvement of lap times, so I was thinking of something else to do when I realized my elbow was dangerously close to the ground in one of the corners. I asked some of the other racers who’d been behind me about the distance to the ground, and they immediately started making fun of me (“yea I got my elbow down once too, and then my butt, back and head followed”). The looks on their faces when I came by to show off my scraped elbow 30 minutes later were priceless!

TriumphElbow-11

What do you do when you’re not riding? Really everything I do has something to do with racing. I run my own team, and am in a transition year towards a full season of AMA. Most days are filled with contacting potential sponsors. I also work out daily, and have come to love riding my bicycle. In my spare time you can usually still find me at the track, hanging out with and supporting my friends. My other love is music! Whenever I do find a new sponsor, I can’t help but treat myself to a concert or new CD.

How Popular is Motorcycling in Your State?

I found this infographic over at MotorcycleRoads.com and I had to share because I was surprised where my state was on the list. Minnesota is number eleven! Minnesota land of two seasons winter and road construction.

How about your state, are you surprised? More or less than you expected?

How Popular is Motorcycling in Your State?

How Popular is Motorcycling in Your State?

Source: MotorcycleRoads.com

Did You Name Your Ride?

Did you name your ride? I did. I named my Suzuki 650 VStrom Suzie. I know what you’re thinking … Suzuki … Suzie. Nope. I picked Suzie because that was the name of my first best friend ever. She lived across the street from me and the same age. We did everything together. True besties! That is until Suzie’s family moved away when we were in third grade. >sniff, sniff< It was natural to name my first bike after my childhood BFF!!

What about you? Did you name your ride? Is there a story behind that name? Do share!!